The Flexitarian Diet: The Mostly Vegetarian Way to Lose Weight, Be Healthier, Prevent Disease, and Add Years to Your Life

| February 3, 2012 | 3 Comments

The Flexitarian Diet: The Mostly Vegetarian Way to Lose Weight, Be Healthier, Prevent Disease, and Add Years to Your Life

Lose weight, increase energy, and boost your immunity—without giving up meat! “With her flexible mix-and-match plans, Dawn Jackson Blatner gives us a smart new approach to cooking and eating.”
–Joy Bauer, M.S., RD, CDN, “Today” show dietitian and bestselling author of Joy Bauer’s Food Cures “The Flexitarian Diet is a fresh approach to eating that’s balanced, smart, and completely do-able.”
–Ellie Krieger, host of Food Network’s “Healthy Appetite” and author of The Food You Crave “Off

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  1. Jackie Newgent, RD "Culinary Nutritionist" says:
    50 of 51 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Highly Recommended!, October 1, 2008

    As a registered dietitian, chef, and fellow author, I find few diet books worthy of recommending. But The Flexitarian Diet is one that I do highly recommend. It’s based on sound science. It’s written in a witty, easy-to-follow style in a way in which you know that Dawn Jackson Blatner, RD, is passionate about what she is suggesting.

    I love that everything is based on straightforward fives–five food groupings, five-week meal plan, and more. But it’s not based on a gimmick like so many diet books. And it’s not really a “diet” as it’s not based on avoidance. It’s a positive, no-guilt approach to eating, which is the most effective approach to healthy eating for a lifetime. In fact, this fresh flexitarian approach is how I eat and what I tell those who are not already vegetarians to strive for. That means if you really want a little bit of meat, it’s okay on occasion.

    Plus, there are many, many recipes (with short ingredient lists!) and shopping checklists included that make eating healthfully and following a meal plan simple–without sacrificing flavor.

    You will enjoy this smart book while getting healthier at the same time!

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  2. K. Jadon says:
    41 of 43 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    What Is The Flexitarian Diet?, October 7, 2008
    By 
    K. Jadon
    (REAL NAME)
      

    From: http://www.BasilAndSpice.com

    Book Review: The Flexitarian Diet: The Mostly Vegetarian Way to Lose Weight, Be Healthier, Prevent Disease, and Add Years to Your Life (McGraw-Hill, 2008) by Dawn Jackson Blatner, RD, LDN

    A licensed and registered dietitian and a national spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association, Dawn Jackson Blatner is also the hostess of a “Healthy Eating’ segment on Chicago’s Fox News in the Morning. Once referring to herself as a “closet meat eater, she now openly calls herself a flexitarian. Dawn is mainly a vegetarian who eats a little red meat on occasion–a flexitarian.

    Dawn Blatner writes that the word “flexitarian” was chosen by the American Dialect Society as the Most Useful Word of the Year (2003). Also, a 2003 study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition sampled 13,000 people and found that 2 of 3 vegetarians eat this way.

    Key Points to The Flexitarian Diet:

    * Eating a plant-based vegetarian diet is the smartest thing we can do for our health.
    * The author has taught flexitarian eating to thousands of clients and has seen them lose 20-80lbs.
    * Phytochemicals in plants protect us from all types of disease.
    * Vegetarians live 3.6 years longer on average than non-vegetarians. (They have less disease.) They also weigh approximately 15% less than non-vegetarians.
    * The Flexitarian Diet is a gradual shifting to a healthier way of eating. It promises a 15-30lb weight loss within 6-12 months. Benefits also include improved: energy, self-esteem, arthritis, blood pressure, cholesterol, sleep, triglyceride and glucose levels. Also associated with this type of diet is a reduced risk of: cancer, diabetes, heart disease.
    * Contains 100 recipes, but no photos of them. Divided into breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snacks, it includes “swaps” for how to add poultry, fish, or red meat to a meal. Nutritional information is listed and the recipes are calorie-controlled, meet the American Heart Association’s certification for sodium and saturated fat levels, contain no artificial ingredients, trans fat, or sugar substitutes. Shopping lists and meal plans are supposed to benefit the reader’s weight loss.

    Examples to try:

    * Burger with Broccoli Raab
    * Black Bean and Zucchini Quesadillas (with cheddar cheese)
    * Pad-Thai-Style Tempeh
    * Pinto and Cheese Poblanos

    The Flexitarian Diet includes a fitness chapter covering the various aspects of how to get moving and get into shape. Advice is given regarding types of exercise, gym memberships, how to maintain motivation, type of shoe to be worn, and how to beat exercise barriers. (Excuses for not exercising)

    Dawn Blatner has 10 pages of references and blocks of facts throughout highlighting important points. The meat of the book discusses vegetarian issues related to food groups, beans, tofu products, flavoring, cost control, organic vs. conventional, etc..

    The Flexitarian Diet certainly catches the eye with a beautifully photographed cover which illustrates the book’s content well. The Flexitarian Diet is a healthy way for the beginning weight-loss conscious person to start. And it is also for those who wish to really make a change for long-lasting health, taking a new approach to how they shop, prepare, and enjoy their food.

    As diet books change into wellness books, more emphasis is put into total body health. The reader should be able to ask such questions as, “How will bad cholesterol be reduced? Will I be able to walk farther? Am I sleeping better?” The Flexitarian Diet hits this mark.

    5 Stars

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  3. Carol says:
    37 of 39 people found the following review helpful:
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Fun, Easy, and Delicious, September 24, 2008
    By 
    Carol (Zebulon, North Carolina) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

    This book could have been titled Healthier and Thinner in Five Easy Steps! The premise of this book is that you don’t have to go to extremes to be healthy. As Dawn Jackson Blatner says on page 1, this diet isn’t about rigid rules, it’s about eating more plants and doing the best you can. She never judges you for what you eat, but makes suggestions about how to add healthy foods and habits to your busy life.

    The Flexitarian Diet is filled with yummy recipes (most have no more than five ingredients!), shopping lists, and expert suggestions for curbing cravings and generally feeling good. The book focuses on five main areas of eating: meat alternatives (although meat is still “allowed”), fruits and veggies, grains, dairy, and sugar and spice. The author introduces one area per week, describing the nutritionist’s favorite ways to incorporate new foods into your diet, or new ways to enjoy foods you already eat.

    I tend to eat pretty healthily already, but I learned a lot from this book. I’ve tagged the pages with the recipes I’ve tried and loved, as well as at least a dozen I can’t wait to try. But I think my favorite thing about it is that it supports the way I like to think about health and eating. I used to be a vegetarian, but I went back to eating meat a few years ago. I always felt a little guilty about it, as though I wasn’t strong enough to resist the smell of a steak on the grill. Flexitarian eating is about trusting yourself and understanding that diet is flexible, and that flexibility is a strength, not a weakness. Thank you, Dawn Jackson Blatner!

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